Autumn Crocus - dog poisons

DOG POISONS IN YOUR GARDEN – THE DOGTOR

Dogs can be very keen to get their paws on tasty and different delights, but not everything out there is good or safe for them to eat. On occasion, a nibble of the wrong thing can result in ill-health. Here’s a rundown of the common garden toxins – although this is not a complete list. Also, whilst in some cases, eating something poisonous can cause a severe reaction, most of the time, the effects will be relatively mild.

GARDEN PLANTS AND FLOWERSDOG POISONS

  • Daffodils and other narcissus bulbs: This plant is a lovely sign of Spring, but the effect of a dog eating one is not so great. It’s vital to keep dogs away from daffodils (or avoid having them in your garden), as consuming one can cause severe nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea.
  • Tulips: The effects of eating Spring’s fine red bloomer can have similar but less severe symptoms to daffodils.
  • Autumn crocus: Not to be confused with ‘spring crocus’. These are planted later in the year and can lead to severe stomach upset if consumed.
  • Amaryllis: These pretty, striking red flowers can warm up a winter garden or house (grown indoors and out), but when eaten by a dog, can also cause vomiting and diarrhoea
  • Larkspur: As well as causing loose bowels, eating Larkspur seeds can lead your dog to get depressed.
  • Oleander: Eating these can cause complications of the heart.
“Oleander Flowers” by Swami Stream is licensed under CC BY 2.0

FERTILIZERS (COMMERCIAL AND NATURAL)DOG POISONS

Using fertilizer is a way to keep a garden healthy, but it doesn’t do your dog any good. The commercial variety contains harmful chemicals, while the more organic fertilizers can contain toxic or dangerous substances, including meal remains.

WILD MUSHROOMS AND TOADSTOOLS (FUNGI)DOG POISONS

There are many different varieties of fungi in the UK, with differing toxicity levels (from none to severe). The effects of those which are dog poisons can range from mild stomach aches to kidney failure. As it can be difficult to tell them apart, the Dogtor advises you to keep your dog away from all of them (to be safe). 

If you think your dog has eaten something poisonous, call your vet immediately.


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